Search found 2434 matches

by Omzinesý
Mon 22 Oct 2018, 21:44
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 5041
Views: 479359

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

p t t͡s k
b d g
m n ŋ
s x
l ʟ
r
ʋ j
by Omzinesý
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 10:44
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Omzinian Scrap thread
Replies: 59
Views: 9807

Re: Omzinian Scrap thread XIX

A Uralic lang more or less closely related to Finnic. Only basic 5 vowel system. Nouns have three declensions, where distinction between Nominative and Accusative is made with changing the last vowel. i-stem NOM -i ACC -e (Estonian meri - mere 'sea') a-stems NOM - zero ACC -a (Estonian linn - linna ...
by Omzinesý
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 10:33
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: A Myth of the Dkuom
Replies: 5
Views: 936

Re: A Myth of the Dkuom

I think Dark World can be compared to heaven, as a religious "place". Yes, I think you are right. The same thing is said two times. The original idea was that the first sentence tells what they did when they found how practical it was, and the second one tells what they do nowadays but there is redu...
by Omzinesý
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 10:29
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: Last word you learned in a foreign language
Replies: 56
Views: 8964

Re: Last word you learned in a foreign language

shimobaatar wrote:
Sat 20 Oct 2018, 01:32
Omzinesý wrote:
Fri 19 Oct 2018, 15:39
They seem to mean some kind of 'heaven'.
Some kind of "heaven"? What do you mean by that?
Edit: Oh, wait, given what Aszev said, did you mean "haven"?
Yes, it seems I typed it wrong, which is not uncommon.
by Omzinesý
Fri 19 Oct 2018, 15:39
Forum: Everything Else
Topic: Last word you learned in a foreign language
Replies: 56
Views: 8964

Re: Last word you learned in a foreign language

I checked Swedish word "lä", and dictionary gave Finnish word "lee", which must be a Swedish loan. I've never heard it. They seem to mean some kind of 'heaven'.
by Omzinesý
Fri 19 Oct 2018, 11:20
Forum: Conworlds & Concultures
Topic: A Myth of the Dkuom
Replies: 5
Views: 936

Re: A Myth of the Dkuom

I'm going to translate this into Vtayn. Is there bad mistakes with English? Nothing horrendous. Mostly dropped definite articles that are actually undroppable. I tried to keep stylistic edits to a minimum and in a couple places added a word where I thought a more idiomatic rendering might suit. Kee...
by Omzinesý
Wed 17 Oct 2018, 14:17
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Yay or Nay?
Replies: 2876
Views: 224873

Re: Yay or Nay?

I'm working on Denkurian's nominal declension system, and I think I am mostly satisfied with where I've ended up, except I'm not too sure about what I have for the genitive plural. I am using the example noun razh man , since it is a consonant stem: sg. pl. nom. razh razhen acc. razhes razhis gen. ...
by Omzinesý
Wed 17 Oct 2018, 10:56
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14163
Views: 937563

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

So, I'm looking at valency-increasing operations, and the general example is the causative (which seems to cover well most intransitive-transitive pairs). Applied to an intransitive verb, it adds an agent and turns the former subject into the patient: "the chair broke" > "I broke the chair," "the b...
by Omzinesý
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 17:38
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 567949

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But PG *b (what ever its realization at the time was) usually produces /b/ in English and Swedish, am I right? (Danish does regularly have a fricative I think.) /v/ intervocalically. OK, then there is no problem, thanks! In the beginning I though it must be something that simple, them it got compli...
by Omzinesý
Mon 15 Oct 2018, 13:49
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 567949

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But PG *b (what ever its realization at the time was) usually produces /b/ in English and Swedish, am I right? (Danish does regularly have a fricative I think.) So my original wondering was how there are words like: live, love, have, wife, etc. that have /v/. They could be exceptions, if there aren'...
by Omzinesý
Sun 14 Oct 2018, 17:31
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 567949

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

But they are not reconstructed *hafa- and *lifa with fricatives that directly yeald /v/ in English at least.
by Omzinesý
Sun 14 Oct 2018, 16:16
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 567949

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

English and Swedish often have v while German has b. Have, ha (va), haben; live, leva, leben etc. What sound change explains them? Might this be what you're looking for? How do we know that it shifted from [β] to [ b]? How do we know Old High German didn't retain a [ b] that lenited to [β] in the o...
by Omzinesý
Sat 13 Oct 2018, 20:05
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 567949

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

English and Swedish often have v while German has b.
Have, ha (va), haben; live, leva, leben etc. What sound change explains them?
by Omzinesý
Sat 13 Oct 2018, 13:46
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: No verbs?
Replies: 5
Views: 319

Re: No verbs?

Yes and no. Cognitive linguistics, which is a theory not a fact, sais that the distinction between things and actions is fundamental for human cognition and it's expressed someway. We can define the prototypical coding of actions and things as verbs and nouns, respectively. Then there is an ever-las...
by Omzinesý
Thu 11 Oct 2018, 20:49
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Words to mean Friend
Replies: 21
Views: 714

Re: Words to mean Friend

I checked Finnish word ystävä. Its etymology seems to be unclear. One explanation was: yskä mean cough (n) it could have something to do with 'breast' yskätä could mean 'to hug' and yskättäva => ystävä could mean 'a hugged one' in the beginning That's a cute etymology but I doesn't seem too plausible.
by Omzinesý
Thu 11 Oct 2018, 17:54
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Mishero مِسْهَرو
Replies: 20
Views: 2881

Re: Mishero مِسْهَرو

Non-finite forms with prefix a- Historically a- must have been an independent nominalizing particle, like English that . In modern Mishero it is a part of many non-finite verb forms. Causal converb ka- (1) kakteb 'because X writes' Simultaneous temporal converb an-/ana- (2) anakteb 'When X is writin...
by Omzinesý
Wed 10 Oct 2018, 15:53
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 567949

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I read an Wikipedia article on Old High German declension. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_High_German_declension#The_-a_declension Does anybody know what the alternate forms (?) tages (-as), tage (-a) etc. are? orthographic differences, dialectal differences, a real sub-declension? The latter en...
by Omzinesý
Wed 10 Oct 2018, 15:52
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread
Replies: 5041
Views: 479359

Re: Random phonology/phonemic inventory thread

p t̯ t k
β ð ɹ ɣ
t͡s̯ t͡s s̯ s
t͡ɬ̯t͡ɬ ɬ̯ ɬ
l̯ l r̯ r
m n̯ n ŋ
j w
by Omzinesý
Mon 08 Oct 2018, 22:08
Forum: Linguistics & Natlangs
Topic: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 6727
Views: 567949

Re: (L&N) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

I read an Wikipedia article on Old High German declension. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_High_ ... declension
Does anybody know what the alternate forms (?) tages (-as), tage (-a) etc. are? orthographic differences, dialectal differences, a real sub-declension?
by Omzinesý
Sun 07 Oct 2018, 14:04
Forum: Conlangs
Topic: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here
Replies: 14163
Views: 937563

Re: (Conlangs) Q&A Thread - Quick questions go here

Old High German used <z> to represent the laminal /s/ derived from PG. *t, while using <s> to represent the apical /s̺/ derived from PG. *s, which later becomes /ʃ/ in word-initial consonant clusters. That could be used as a precedent for writing /s/, /ʃ/ as <z>, <s>, if your orthography was establ...