The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Axiem » Mon 09 Oct 2017, 04:00

Reyzadren wrote:Next question: Vehicles in your conworld that are not utilised on Earth?
Mto has airships, which I'm pretty sure are of the Final-Fantasy-style propellers-on-top variety. Etheric manipulation is a pretty large component to making sure they keep running, but they've been around long enough that it's a pretty well-understood technology.

Airships are more expensive to take (or use for shipping) than waterships, but they're also faster. Most goods are still shipped by watership, because of this.

My question is inspired by this article.

Next question: What does your culture think of smiling?
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Evynova
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Evynova » Wed 18 Oct 2017, 15:20

Axiem wrote:Next question: What does your culture think of smiling?
The K'anerhtóh have a very strict social etiquette. Self-control is an admired virtue, and letting emotions take the best of you, even for a brief moment, can be enough for you to be disowned by your own family. Not being able to suppress your feelings is considered immature and juvenile, whether it is anger, sadness or joy. Granted, it would be more acceptable to smile in public than to cry, it might still offend a number of people. It is especially rude to let your emotions show when addressing somebody of a higher social rank, and the affront may potentially dishonour your entire family. If, say, the king (the equivalent thereof) gave you all his fortune and property, the only acceptable reaction would be to acquiesce and thank him with a phrase which roughly translates to "I greatly thank you": emcíranáróhin.

Smiling at someone can also be interpreted as courtship, but only acceptable in an intimate/private environment. Smiling at someone who passes you by would be as offensive as slapping a stranger's butt on the street in the West.

How does your culture perceive manual labour? Is it degrading or, on the contrary, valued and honoured?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Ànradh » Wed 18 Oct 2017, 23:32

Evynova wrote:How does your culture perceive manual labour? Is it degrading or, on the contrary, valued and honoured?
This varies by caste.
Commoners are the manual labourers of the society in almost all circumstances, and a willingness to work hard and efficiently is considered an admirable trait amongst them, but they are under no illusions about the work's glamour and would rather move up a caste to avoid it if they could.

Warriors are effectively the nobility of the society, and generally consider manual work beneath them. Commoners were brought to perform these tasks when on a large scale campaign, though this was a rare occurrence, raiding being the preferred belligerent action used against a rival clan; in which case, male warriors would perform whatever minor labour tasks would be needed. Usually, the lower 'ranked' warriors (those of lower status) would be expected to do this.
Women from the warrior caste generally didn't fight, and were often only permitted to do so if they were avenging a spouse, father etc. Women from this caste are the merchants of the society, and will also avoid manual labour whenever possible.
The occupation has effectively ended the old clan system, at least as regards internecine conflict within the annexed settlements, however.

Priests of more hermetic persuasion do, of course, perform manual labour out of necessity, and other priests of the right-hand-paths at least pay lip service to the idea that hard work and denial of luxury are methods of attaining spiritual purity, thus bringing them closer to attaining the forgiveness of the Mother Afar. In practice, the priestly class exercises significant political authority and those priests of higher status can often find themselves succumbing to corruption and hypocrisy.
Priests of the left-hand-paths obviously try to avoid anything that distracts them from their devotions -- drowning themselves in 'darkness' to prove their strength of spirit by resisting its lure-- however, there exist hermetic traditions here too, and such priests again must perform manual labour out of necessity.
on the whole, priests generally find themselves exempt from heavy labour, and few complain about it.

As for the rebels, they all consider themselves members of the warrior class (a bit of propaganda intended to draw commoners away from the settlements and drive more of their people to continue fighting) regardless of their class by birth, though most of those hiding in the guerilla camps are warriors by birthright.
As a result, everyone is also a de facto commoner, for they simply don't have the numbers to abide by traditional roles, even if they hadn't committed to elevating the status of rebelling commoners.
This an adjustment many warriors are finding difficult, alongside the large number of women in what is a traditionally male combat role, and that the rebel priests have compounded their political power and become, to many, insufferably overbearing.

How do your cultures view marriage? For love? Politics? Status?
Sin ar Pàrras agus nì sinne mar a thogras sinn. Choisinn sinn e agus ’s urrainn dhuinn ga loisgeadh.
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by elemtilas » Fri 20 Oct 2017, 03:29

Ànradh wrote:How do your cultures view marriage? For love? Politics? Status?
Men are much more likely to marry for dynastic / political or status reasons. Or even simple economics. For many, though, love is also a component, or at least develops over time.

Daine are much more likely to marry out of mutual affection & love in the first instance, though in some places, other considerations may also have their say.

Turghun marry because they have no choice. Once a couple destined to be together meet, there's no denying the obvious, no tedious courtship. It's like cesium and water meeting for the first time. Mind you, the whole community puts on a good party after the fireworks!
Reyzadren wrote:Vehicles in your conworld that are not utilised on Earth?
This:

Image
Next: How do your folks tell time?
Image

If we stuff the whole chicken back into the egg, will all our problems go away? --- Wandalf of Angera
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Fluffy8x » Fri 20 Oct 2017, 11:27

elemtilas wrote:
Ànradh wrote:How do your cultures view marriage? For love? Politics? Status?
Men are much more likely to marry for dynastic / political or status reasons. Or even simple economics. For many, though, love is also a component, or at least develops over time.

Daine are much more likely to marry out of mutual affection & love in the first instance, though in some places, other considerations may also have their say.

Turghun marry because they have no choice. Once a couple destined to be together meet, there's no denying the obvious, no tedious courtship. It's like cesium and water meeting for the first time. Mind you, the whole community puts on a good party after the fireworks!
Reyzadren wrote:Vehicles in your conworld that are not utilised on Earth?
This:

Image
Next: How do your folks tell time?
(Rymako, a few thousand years ago)

cf. lek-\tsaro-ma sil lek-ma sil sötše-\rymako Chapter 10
TL;DR they use tidal days instead of solar days. They intercalate months and years as typical of a lunisolar calendar, though. Within the day, either subdivisions of the solar day (traditionally) or of the tidal day (modern) are used. In the modern system, the tidal day is divided into 23 kan, each of which is divided into 80 sine, each of which is divided into 40 bařuk.

What do your folks eat that we'd find unusual to eat? Or vice versa.
an siina levian t'isorakateez
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by lsd » Fri 20 Oct 2017, 18:02

Fluffy8x wrote:What do your folks eat that we'd find unusual to eat? Or vice versa.
Even if pasuvalodazeme is a language not a country...
Is it really the same thing to eat meat than to eat non-human muscles...

how did you manage body decorations in your conculture...
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Ànradh » Fri 20 Oct 2017, 21:09

lsd wrote:how did you manage body decorations in your conculture...
Warriors scar 'bites' -- semicircles of five dots -- into their shoulders and upper arms to represent kills in battle, so named after the tradition of collecting a slain warrior's teeth as proof. These grisly trophies will be attached to a leather thong and stored in an ornamented case in the warrior's home; it's brought out and worn as a necklace for ceremonies of war and victory.
Men and women from all castes scar their faces using distinct patterns to identify clan allegiance; as they're exogamous, the clans also have unique tattooing that they apply to the face of married women to indicate her adoption into her husband's clan.
To indicate reaching puberty, men of all castes will scarify their chests or backs in various dot patterns, while women scar their thighs and hips. In both cases, more extensive scarring is seen as desirable.
Priests that 'marry' their spiritual patron will tattoo the spirit's hypersigil onto their stomachs, a series of jagged, spiraling patterns derived from a form of numerology.
Priests can also scar or tattoo talismanic lesser sigils onto those who ask (and offer recompense).
Lastly, tattooing of the arms and legs can be applied as indicators of status; it's thus rare to see commoners with much, if any, such tattoos. The preference for design aesthetic varies by clan, but interweaving shapes and knots are popular motifs.

As for actual jewelery, it's considered ostentatious and so kept subtle (especially on men, who risk accusations of effeminacy for being too gaudy). Jewelery can consist of bangles, necklaces and finger- or hair-rings. Piercings are considered deviant and are subject to such extreme social stigma that only outlaws would consider wearing them, lest they be ripped out in the street.
Copper is the most common metal for use in jewelery making, followed by gold. Beads of stone and glass, including obsidian, are popular, especially as hair decorations.
Ornately knit wool, on the other hand, is highly prized.

Bulrushes and heather are tied into hair for ceremonial purposes -- for unarmed duels (usually among young male warriors), and for weddings and child-birth celebrations respectively.

Ropes of bells designed to be worn around throat, hips, ankles and wrists are worn by the priestly class when conducting a range of ceremonies, be they folk theatre renditions of cultural legends, communication with the spiritual intermediaries of the Mother Afar, or even warning to the fey and fay elemental of the forests, mountains and rivers -- never those of the ocean though; such creatures of chaos are black and bitter in aspect and temper. They're designed to chime to the rhythms of set or improvised dances that require a surprising degree of athleticism to properly perform, requiring flexibility, strength, endurance, pain conditioning and muscle isolations.

What subjects are taboo for every day discourse? Are these subjects likely to be discussed in private with close associates, or not even then?
Sin ar Pàrras agus nì sinne mar a thogras sinn. Choisinn sinn e agus ’s urrainn dhuinn ga loisgeadh.
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by lsd » Sat 21 Oct 2017, 11:39

Ànradh wrote:What subjects are taboo for every day discourse? Are these subjects likely to be discussed in private with close associates, or not even then?
In asụsụnkeakaya, because of a priori language, using words with double articulation is not polite...
It is taboo to import foreigner words...
When one uses one it is for laughing about it...
It's tolerate to use them only with foreigners in language lessons...

Is gallantry with women considered polite or insulting...
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by elemtilas » Sat 21 Oct 2017, 20:01

Ànradh wrote:What subjects are taboo for every day discourse? Are these subjects likely to be discussed in private with close associates, or not even then?
Among Daine, something would have to be pretty serious for it to be a tabu subject. Certainly the details of a rape or suicide or the specifics of a child born of a rape would be tabu for ordinary conversation. These events are either symptoms or sequellae of very serious and deep spiritual illness. Close family might know and talk about these things from time to time, but they're not for ordinary luncheon discussion.
lsd wrote: Is gallantry with women considered polite or insulting...
Gallantry per se would be considered insulting (to both parties), yet Daine do indeed exhibit these kinds of behaviours yet are misunderstood by Men (who generally speaking see such behaviour towards women as a mark of good upbringing and social grace).

Among Men, if a gentleman places his cloak on the shoulders of a woman because it's a chilly night, other men will esteem him because he's behaving in a gentlemanly fashion. On the other hand, if they saw a Daine girl place her cloak upon the shoulders of a boy because it's a chilly night, those same other men would alternately scorn the boy for taking the woman's cloak or (privately, at least) praise him for training her very well indeed and might also think ill of the girl for behaving unlike a gentlewoman.

Now, among Daine, they would, if they understood Men's behaviour, consider it very odd and somewhat demeaning. It's a kind of socially demeaning task that's not done for any purpose other than to show everyone else how gallant and gentlemanly one is. According to Daine behaviour, it's considered good and right for anyone, girl or boy, to exercise "gallantry" with anyone else, boy or girl. So, they have no issue with a girl giving a boy her cloak; they have no issue with a boy opening a door for a girl; they have no issue with mixed couples sharing tasks or doing small acts of that sort for each other. They understand these as acts of love & compassion. They esteem such acts done for the right reason above others.
lsd wrote: how did you manage body decorations in your conculture...
Daine manage body decoration very well, if I do say so! Unless worn for protection, clothing is just not considered particularly needful. But Daine áre more than happy to wear some articles of clothing as decoration. This gives them rather large canvasses upon which to creatively express themselves.

Clothing as Decoration --- light, brightly printed fabrics are favoured. Silks, fine linen, fine woolens. Fur. A Daine will usually wear little more than a raka, which is kind of like a sarong. If the cloth is plain, it will generally be woven of many colours; patterned weaving is very popular; embroidery is also popular. Plain cloth may also be block printed or inked or dyed. The raka is a basic decoration. It can be worn all around the body, held up by a belt; it can be worn off one hip, leaving the other exposed; it can be worn around the neck fastened by a brooch; it can be draped across the shoulders like a cape or draped over the wing-elbows.

Made and Natural Articles as Decoration --- Daine love metal decorations: rings for fingers are not favoured, but rings for toes, rings for wrists and arms, rings for ankles, those they love to fashion. Chains for neck, wrist, ankle or knee. Cuffs for arms, ears and wing-arms. Plain or decorated bands; twisted wire; filigree. Best metal is silver; then bronze or copper; then gold. Eisensilver & platinum are also well liked. Naturally occurring gems --- crystals, geodes, coloured river pebbles (glacial). Shells, horn, antler, teeth, tusks, ivory, hair, feathers. Fascinators, headdresses, arm and ankle bands made from leather, beads and deathers; necklaces of teeth and carved ivory and raw gems. Garlands and posies made from flowers, vines, small fruits or nuts, those are always in fashion.

Temporary Ink as Decoration --- Daine live a very long time and long ago discovered that tattoos that begin to fade away after a century or two are so not it. Their answer is marrenderri, a technique much like henna application. This is a very skilled and time consuming art, and depending on how much of your body you want inked, and how intricate the designs, you might spend a good couple days at it. Fine designs of leaves, vines, berries, flowers, swooping tendrils --- those they like best. Paisley-like geometric patterns, those are okay. Patterns that look like filigree or beads, they like those, too.

Permanent Ink as Decoration --- Permanent ink is almost always reserved for ritual decoration. A clan tattoo is often placed on the right shoulder blade or at the base of the neck. Some married couples (and triples) will have a small tattoo placed along the breast bone. Sometimes warriors or hunters will sport a totem of some kind on the left shoulder or chest.

Hair and Feathers --- Daine (of the Tana kindred at least) are well known for the length of their hair. They almost never cut it (those of the Eastlands are more likely to), but do like to do it up in complex braids. Some braids are very tiny, perhaps only a couple dozen hairs and are very amenable to decoration with beads and bright bird feathers. Topknots are favoured by some, usually girls, and these will often be decorated with long carved bone or wood hair sticks. Turghun hair, in contrast, is heavy and thick and grows in tightly matted rope-like locks. Their hair molts every couple years in Fall, so rarely grows much longer than about shoulder or mid-back length. They do sometimes apply tints of different colours to different locks.

Next: If they have this kind of food at all, what kinds of foods do your folks eat as snacks?
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If we stuff the whole chicken back into the egg, will all our problems go away? --- Wandalf of Angera
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Evynova » Sat 28 Oct 2017, 13:23

If they have this kind of food at all, what kinds of foods do your folks eat as snacks?
Every K'anerhtónian family knows how to make thét'akh (/tʰœt’ɑk(ʰ)/), a candy-like preparation, made with fermented milk. Cheese and other dairy products are a big part of the K'anerhtónian diet, due to the harshness of the mountainous climate they have to deal with. Thét'akh are a mixture of milk (traditionally goat milk) and fruit puree, left to ferment near a fireplace for a day or two, until the milk coagulates into curds. The fruit can be replaced with cereals, or can be omitted altogether but it is often added to the milk for flavour. The curd bits are usually eaten as is, but they can also be poured into a bowl with the rest of the yet-uncoagulated milk. They are also a popular bread topping amongst children, and unflavoured thét'akh are sometimes added into bowls of soup. Each family may follow a different recipe (different fruits, cereals; varying fermentation times; use of salt, spices or not; etc), but most K'anerhtónian children carry a pouch containing a handful of thét'akh made by their mother or sister(s).

Next question: if your conculture is religious, how do they deal with people of a different faith, or non-believers? Conversely, if they are non-religious, how do they treat believers?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by eldin raigmore » Sun 29 Oct 2017, 02:38

Evynova wrote:Next question: if your conculture is religious, how do they deal with people of a different faith, or non-believers? Conversely, if they are non-religious, how do they treat believers?
Adpihi are indeed very religious.
They think every faith is the same as every other faith; only the adherent's relationship to their God is personalized, specifically between that adherent and God.
(IMO they're wrong about all faiths being one faith; but they make it work.)
People of any faith, no matter how different, as long as it is tolerant of those of a different faith, are at no disadvantage in Adpihi society.
(Intolerance isn't tolerated, but that's hardly ever an issue anymore.)

Non-believers, OTOH, suffer several disadvantages.
This isn't deliberate on the part of the Adpihi; they're not even aware of how difficult they make it for non-believers.
The reason for the disadvantages, and for the Adpihi's "blindspot" regarding them, is that the Adpihi just can't get their heads around the idea that someone might not have a religion:
And, that, so many of the benefits of Adpihi society are funneled through faith-community-based channels.
Adpihi think they don't discriminate against any kind of belief that tolerates their own beliefs.

Next question?
What major opinions do your conpeople have about themselves that, in your opinion as their creator, you think are mistaken?
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Re: The Conculture/Conpeople Opinions Thread

Post by Evynova » Sun 29 Oct 2017, 11:42

eldin raigmore wrote: What major opinions do your conpeople have about themselves that, in your opinion as their creator, you think are mistaken?
Each of the concultures that I have come up with (or still need to detail and post about on the forum) have opinions that I completely disagree with, whether they're political or social. First of all, the K'anerhtóh are extremely xenophobic and are opposed to the idea of immigration. They consider their culture to be the "purest", the "best" one that's ever been conceived. They do not indulge in imperialism and respect the right of other nations to have their territory and their own belief/political systems, but they are almost completely closed to the outside world. They will very seldom allow foreigners to settle (at least in the capital, more remote cities are, for several reasons, more welcoming) and emigrating from the country is regarded as treason. A very common punishment for serious crimes in the K'anerhtónian justice system is exile: since you can't behave yourself properly, you're sentenced to leave and "mingle with the inferior people". Their country is probably the best place to live, when compared to the neighbouring states, but they are so proud and chauvinistic about it, looking down on the rest of humanity with contempt, that they sometimes shoot themselves in the foot because of it.

The Soo ta Aangii treat every living thing with respect, considering every possible living creature as equal to them. This means that they do not hunt, and they do not even kill plants for food. Their whole society traditionally consists of leaderless nomadic tribes, and their justice system (or equivalent thereof) is based on sacred, religious principles that they uphold at all costs. Their respect for nature and every living being sounds great on paper, but the way their whole moral system is vastly different from what we have here. First of all, (not that it's necessarily a bad thing) they are polyamorous. Marriage is a completely foreign concept to them; they just get intimate as they feel like it, and children are raised together, every member of the tribe equally playing the role of parent. The problem is that some things that are immoral to us, are totally acceptable to them: incest, even between brother and sister or parent and child is okay. Worse, pedophilia is also fine. The line between child and adult is nearly non-existent; as long as a person can speak, they are considered capable of making decisions of their own, and young children are sometimes influenced into things they cannot reasonably consent to. On the other hand, killing a plant, even by accident, may grant you to be disowned from your tribe, or even sacrificed as compensation for the damage caused to the forest. Illnesses and injuries are also usually not treated, because they are thought to be the forest manifesting its disapproval for a mistake committed, even unbeknownst.

There are also the other concultures which I haven't detailed enough to make posts about on the forum, but for example, the Urkhaan nation is a female supremacy where men are violently oppressed, and a merciless theocracy (the Soo ta Aangii originally lived there before they were forced into exile because of their different religious ideas). The Hafnjans have a very hierarchised society where, contrary to the Urkhaa, women hardly have rights at all. The Roderans, the empire that gave birth to the Hafnjans, are extremely brutal and more imperialistic than any other nation on the planet; they also consider their worldview to be better and aspire to convert and subdue every other nation.

EDIT: I might have misunderstood the question, whoopsie

Next question:
What do your conpeople think of suicide?
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