The Region's languages: Apaan and its "benefactors"

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Keenir
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The Region's languages: Apaan and its "benefactors"

Post by Keenir » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 03:19

(scroll down to the last post, at least for now, please; thank you)

APAAN is a cousin to ABANF, of which we have already made a passing acquaintance. Apaan was originally spoken by the inhabitants of the slopes of a single extinct volcano, roughly the size of Olympus Mons; if the origin changes, you will be informed.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
PHONETICS - Post #2
AFFIXES - Post #3
TITLES, MORE NAMES, And a bit of politeness - Post #5

Links:
Abanf - http://cbb.aveneca.com/viewtopic.php?f= ... ilit=Abanf
IPA - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internati ... c_Alphabet
Last edited by Keenir on Sat 29 Aug 2015, 23:03, edited 2 times in total.
At work on Apaan: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4799
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Keenir » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 03:29

Keenir wrote:APAAN
PHONETICS:

Vowels:
<a a '>
[æ a ʔ]
æ has three distinguishable lengths: [æ], [æ:], [æ::]

a has only two distinguishable lengths: [a], [a:]


Consonants:
<b p pp t th d dd g gg>
[b p p: t T d d: g g: ]

<r s j y m mm n ng nn>
<r s j j m m: n N n: ]

Apaan utilizes a syllabary, which was introduced into Abanf, which gave Apaan its number words.
At work on Apaan: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4799
Keenir
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Keenir » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 04:08

Keenir wrote:APAAN
PHONETICS:
Vowels:
<a a '>
[æ a ʔ]
æ has three distinguishable lengths: [æ], [æ:], [æ::][/quote]

att = numbers - counting. "Aab ang ... att #" = "I have... #."

ag = numbers.

ag apt = Lit. "number without"; used for "without counting" such as - an unknown number, an unknowable number (like when the passenger pigeons blot out the sun - you wanna count them?)

an = name "particle"(or that was the original intent...things may have changed over the course of several pages)

an Alsa = Elsa.
Except in the case of borrowings (see above), Apaan children tend to be named after terrifying and-or repulsive things. (I feel sorry for the kid whose mom was a tourist and saw someone choking to death on a hamburger)

an Akaasta [æk.æst.æ] = Tiger.

If a long vowel shifts, its word takes on a "not quite" implication...

an Akaasta [æk.æast.æ] = a Thylacine, what Mary Jane calls Peter Parker, a toy or white tiger.

aab ang
[æ:b æN]
I am, 1Present, used for alienable POSS. {inalienable is something different}

an Agapa = leg

'g- [ʔg] = inalienable POSS.

an 'Gagapa = my leg

'gasaat [ʔg.æs.æ:t] = my suit

'gasaat (an) Tony Stark = Tony Stark's suit
{not sure if "an" should go there}

" 'gasaat aab ang an ('Gasaat Aab Ang)"
'g-asaat aab_ang an 'g-asaat aab_ang
informal (and formal)
Suit I_am I/Mr
Suit I_am I/Mr Suit-I-Am
"The suit and I are one." -Tony Stark.

***
'j- & 'y-

(remember that att means counting? good...

'jatt, 'yatt [ ʔj.æt:] = still counting, the counting is ongoing.

'japas, 'yapas [ ʔj.pæs] = still [being mourned]

'j'gagapa, 'y'gagapa [ ʔj.ʔg.æg.æp.æ] = [its] still my leg.
:)

***

'mm-
[ ʔm:]
'mmatt [ m:.æt:] = stopped counting, no longer counting

'mmagagapa [ ʔm:.æg.æg.æp.æ] = [its] not my leg anymore

***

amd
[amd]
we shall, let us

'jappang amd = we shall eat and drink

'mmappang amd = we shall stop eating and drinking

To date, Apaan has no known "simple" prefixes - no lone "we" or "I" without either a possessive or a (mode).

***

"...wash my corpse well." -part of a Hittite inscription.

...'g-astarrad alandaapaar ('md)
... my-corpse wash(and.ready) (you?)

***

"It is possible to fly without motors,
"but not without knowledge."
--Wilbur Wright.

In Apaan, both "is possible to" and "might" are asa.

***

Reduplication {again}...

'mm- -> 'mm'mm- -> 'mmamm- = leaving, departing, going away.

'mmammagagapa [ʔm:.am:.agagapa] = my leg's going away.

apal [æp.æl] = he is, she is.
'dal [ d.æl]= woman.

'mmammang apal 'dal = she is leaving.
{"'dal" simply specifies; otherwise}...

'mmammang apal = the person is leaving.
-ang = is {proposed meaning; thus far, its the translation that makes the most sense; unless its a null}

'mmamm'a aakal'a apal 'dal = she is leaving [her] girlhood.

-'a [ʔa] = analogous to (Old) English -hood.
aakal-'a = girl-hood
At work on Apaan: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4799
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Sumelic » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 04:24

Does the period represent a syllable break? If so, what are the principles of that?
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Keenir » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 04:33

Keenir wrote:
Keenir wrote:APAAN
PHONETICS:
Vowels:
<a a '>
[æ a ʔ]
æ has three distinguishable lengths: [æ], [æ:], [æ::]
an = name "particle"(or that was the original intent...things may have changed over the course of several pages)

an Alsa = Elsa.
Except in the case of borrowings (see above), Apaan children tend to be named after terrifying and-or repulsive things. (I feel sorry for the kid whose mom was a tourist and saw someone choking to death on a hamburger)

an Akaasta [æk.æst.æ] = Tiger.

If a long vowel shifts, its word takes on a "not quite" implication...

'g- [ʔg] = inalienable POSS.
[/quote]

NAMES, TITLES, AND A BIT OF POLITENESS...

"go ahead" = atatath 'd aach = please, move on [in line][while I continue thinking].
'd in my notes is "High Politeness."

]but, you can't just drop the 'd to get the line from Age of Ultron, because it means, literally...

atatath aach
[æt.æt.aT] [æ:C]
sweep under,below,sole.of.feet,belly.of.animal

'kad [ k.æd] = by the, of the {archaic use, rare; ?replaced by 'thadda ?}

an Apas Alaar 'Kad = Penthesilea = Mourned By The People

apas [æp.æs] mourn {cognate to Abanf's}
alaar [al.æ:r] (one or two?)


Next, I had a basic illustration - three concentric ovals:
The innermost oval was labeled
English Nuclear Family, Apaan apaarrat 'fal [æp.aæ:r:.æt ʔf.al]
The next oval around that one, was labeled
English Extended Family, Roman Familias, Apaan apaaarr 'l [æp.æ::r: ʔl]
The next circle outward...
Scythian Massagetai ("great clan"), Apaan apaarhaal [æp.æ:rh.æ:l]

Playing with reduplication...
aab -> aabaab ->
aabaad (no)
aabaaad (no)
aabaaap (no)
aabaap (yes) = owning

?? Anaabaap = The Owners {a team name?}

An'kaarh'r Aabaap 'K = Arimaspi = Owners of Horses.

Pkpupes = Worthy Of Armor = an 'Raggaa(s) Saat 'Thadda [ ʔr.æg:.æ s.æ:t ʔT.ad:.a]

"worthy" is a noun, or functions as such, in Apaan.

Serague = Wearing/Armed with a Dagger/Sword = an Saat 'Daas 'Thadda. [s.æat ʔd.a:s ʔT.ad:.a]

a 'daas has been described as both a large knife & as a little sword.
At work on Apaan: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4799
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Keenir » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 04:34

Sumelic wrote:Does the period represent a syllable break?
yes.
If so, what are the principles of that?
principles? I'm afraid I don't understand.
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Sumelic » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 22:28

Sorry for the lack of clarity, I was trying to ask about syllabification and how words are divided into syllables/what kind of syllables are allowed and which are the most common for different word roots.

[æk.æst.æ]
[ʔg.æs.æ:t]
[ʔj.pæs]
[d.æl]

The syllables in these words seem odd to me because there's never any maximization-of-onset, and there appear to be very few syllables that even have onsets. But there are also syllables that are composed of one or more consonants without a vowel. I was wondering if there are reasons for this pattern.
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Keenir » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 22:53

Sumelic wrote:Sorry for the lack of clarity, I was trying to ask about syllabification and how words are divided into syllables/what kind of syllables are allowed and which are the most common for different word roots.
ah; no, you were very clear - I just didn't know what you were asking.
[æk.æst.æ]
[ʔg.æs.æ:t]
[ʔj.pæs]
[d.æl]

The syllables in these words seem odd to me because there's never any maximization-of-onset, and there appear to be very few syllables that even have onsets.
onset?
I'm sorry for these questions, but I don't know what an onset is. (maybe I've been reading the wrong language books)
But there are also syllables that are composed of one or more consonants without a vowel.
well, the glottal stop functions as a vowel, at least for now (I may replace it in the future)...ones like your last example, I forgot to add the stop to in front of the d - mea culpa.
I was wondering if there are reasons for this pattern.
hm. this will be something I need to address when I finish making the syllabary (work began on it, just need to sort it & remove redundancies, etc)

in the meantime, thus far, the only pattern I intended was VC, with occasional -V word-final.

thank you for your help.
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Ahzoh » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 23:09

An onset consonant like...

A word /baT/ where "b" would be the onset consonant, the "a" would be the nucleus, and "T" is the coda consonant.
In most languages, syllables to to have maximum onset, so /ak.at/ is more likely to become /a.kat/...
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Sumelic » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 23:19

Keenir wrote:
Sumelic wrote: [æk.æst.æ]
[ʔg.æs.æ:t]
[ʔj.pæs]
[d.æl]

The syllables in these words seem odd to me because there's never any maximization-of-onset, and there appear to be very few syllables that even have onsets.
onset?
I'm sorry for these questions, but I don't know what an onset is.
OK. In the most common theories of syllabification, syllables are divided into onset, nucleus and coda; generally the onset is a consonant or consonant cluster that comes at the start of the syllable, and the nucleus is a vowel (the "main vowel"), with the coda being whatever comes after that. So in the English word "speak" /spik/, the /sp/ is the onset, the /i/ is the nucleus, and the /k/ is the coda. Some varieties of English are also analyzed as having consonants in the nucleus in some cases. (For example, the word "hurl" may be analyzed as /hr̩l/ with /r/ being the nucleus.)

As far as I know, all syllables have a nucleus. In fact, this is what makes them syllabic. But depending on the language, a syllable may not need to have an onset or coda. However, in general there is a preference across languages and within individual languages for syllables to have onsets. This is the principle of "maximizing onsets." In some languages, this preference has given rise to processes of syllabification or re-syllabification that act to give onsets to syllables that otherwise would not have any. For example, in French, one such process is called enchaînment and you can see it in the phonetic realization of the phrase "entre eux," ("between them"), [ɑ̃.tʁø]. (When pronounced word-by word, you get [ɑ̃tʁ(ə)] and [ø].)

This preference does not seem to exist in Apaan, however.
But there are also syllables that are composed of one or more consonants without a vowel.
well, the glottal stop functions as a vowel, at least for now (I may replace it in the future)...ones like your last example, I forgot to add the stop to in front of the d - mea culpa.
Thanks, that's the sort of thing I was wondering about!
I was wondering if there are reasons for this pattern.
hm. this will be something I need to address when I finish making the syllabary (work began on it, just need to sort it & remove redundancies, etc)

in the meantime, thus far, the only pattern I intended was VC, with occasional -V word-final.
Hmm, so is [ʔj.pæs] also meant to be split up another way, or are there some CVC syllables as well?
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Re: Apaan, or "its not my leg anymore"

Post by Keenir » Wed 01 Jul 2015, 23:43

Thank you for the clarification and explanation.
Sumelic wrote:
Keenir wrote:
Sumelic wrote:The syllables in these words seem odd to me because there's never any maximization-of-onset, and there appear to be very few syllables that even have onsets.
onset?
I'm sorry for these questions, but I don't know what an onset is.
OK. In the most common theories of syllabification, syllables are divided into onset, nucleus and coda; generally the onset is a consonant or consonant cluster that comes at the start of the syllable, and the nucleus is a vowel (the "main vowel"), with the coda being whatever comes after that. So in the English word "speak" /spik/, the /sp/ is the onset, the /i/ is the nucleus, and the /k/ is the coda. Some varieties of English are also analyzed as having consonants in the nucleus in some cases. (For example, the word "hurl" may be analyzed as /hr̩l/ with /r/ being the nucleus.)

As far as I know, all syllables have a nucleus. In fact, this is what makes them syllabic. But depending on the language, a syllable may not need to have an onset or coda. However, in general there is a preference across languages and within individual languages for syllables to have onsets. This is the principle of "maximizing onsets." In some languages, this preference has given rise to processes of syllabification or re-syllabification that act to give onsets to syllables that otherwise would not have any. For example, in French, one such process is called enchaînment and you can see it in the phonetic realization of the phrase "entre eux," ("between them"), [ɑ̃.tʁø]. (When pronounced word-by word, you get [ɑ̃tʁ(ə)] and [ø].)
ah, okay. makes sense.

I guess I never considered onsets (under any name), because I thought things like that were found in CVC & CVCV & VCV(C) langs...[tad.baja.olot] to put them in one.

And then there were the CV and VC languages, where there were syllable breaks [ev.re tu] every two, and thus not leaving room for codas or onsets
This preference does not seem to exist in Apaan, however.
It will now.

I was wondering if there are reasons for this pattern.
hm. this will be something I need to address when I finish making the syllabary (work began on it, just need to sort it & remove redundancies, etc)

in the meantime, thus far, the only pattern I intended was VC, with occasional -V word-final.
Hmm, so is [ʔj.pæs] also meant to be split up another way, or are there some CVC syllables as well?[/quote]

I would guess [ʔj.ʔp.æs] was my intent...though I was going to ask in the Quick Questions later today, if glottal stops would shift, which would result in [ʔjʔ.pæs] or something like that.
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The Region's languages: Apaan & its "benefactors"

Post by Keenir » Sat 29 Aug 2015, 22:48

NEWS REPORT: Plague has struck the lands of the Apaan-Abanf Language Family {Ap-Ab.L.F.}. Tseer medics have not as yet pinpointed the vector responsible, but feel confident the disease is on its last legs.

Already expanding, the Tseer nation has used this blight as a reason to expand into the Ap-Ab.L.F. region, so as to best tend to those sick and dying, as well as to defeat this disease before it spreads further.

Critics hold the Tseer are using this disaster to impose their own language upon the Ap-Ab.L.F. region. The Tseer flatly deny this accusation.

The only nation strong enough to stop any Tseer conquest, however, is the Gu -- but will they break their longstanding isolationist policy to intervene?


TABLE OF CONTENTS:
APAAN -
Notes: APAAN is a cousin to ABANF, of which we have already made a passing acquaintance. Apaan was originally spoken by the inhabitants of the slopes of a single extinct volcano, roughly the size of Olympus Mons; if the origin changes, you will be informed.
Phonetics - (under revision)
Classes -
TSEER:
GU:

sample comparison:
Medicine/medication-
-aganjat- {apaan}
szenturl-as {tseer}

[br]
the Classes of APAAN:
Class One: ge- eg "Prickly Things"
Class Two: the- -eth "Unseen Things"
Class Three: shte- -esht "Lose-able Things" {worthiness}
Class Four: ee'- -_(m)ee "Warm Things & Edible Things" {the apostrophe has no phonetic value; its role is typographic in Apaan's and other writing systems}
Class Five: pfe- -epf

examples:
ge-paaratar-eg = hedgehog
the-paaratar-eth = stonefish
shte-paaratar-esht = arm
ee'-paaratare-_ee = rhino(ish)

[br]
towards speaking APAAN:

On bilingual signs and posters:
!EKT! Apashal Theadadalateth ! Abat-Aagan Geadadalateg ! EKT!
warning.beware LOC*.watch.for mosquitos ! hauling.carrying-disease mosquitos ! warning.beware

thorn -> seashell -> horn -> cattle...are all Prickly Class by analogy and-or similarity.

I saw an Auroch here.
apashal ge-Aarak-eg apashal
<here.saw auroch here.saw>
GeAarakeg aaazatz apashal

aaazatz = I did do

aatagaatak = wood(s) place

GeAarakeg aatagaatak aaazatz apashal
I saw an Auroch in this woods/woodland

GeAarakeg egaaa(sh) aaazatz apashal
(GeAarakeg egaaa aaazatz apashal?)
I saw a hornless Auroch.

GeAarakeg eeaaash aaazatz apashal
I saw a cold {frozen} Auroch.

DweAnatanew aaazatz apashal
I see a bag here.

aapaach = stomach

DweAnataanew aapaach aaazatz apashal
I see a full bag here.

LOC.:
aashaatzaan = clouds
ashaataf(an) = floor, platter

... aa dweanataanew aashaatzaan.
... is above/over the bag

... aa dweanataanew ashaataf(an).
... is under/below the bag.

Aaazatz apashal ... geaarakeg aashaatzaan theadadalateth. Ag aaapsh adat(al) adat(al) !

ag = no
aaapsh = beer
adat(al) = I do do
adat(al) = I do do -> for me

Geadadalateg aa dweanataanew aagashtan
The mosquitos's on the/atop the bag.

{are the following two an example of See vs Saw? personal preference on the part of the individual speakers?}

Theagaarammeth aaazatz apashal
I see the mountain.

Ee'agaaram_mee aaazatz apashal
I see the mountain.

GeAarakeg aagashtan ee'agaaram_mee aaatatz apashal.
I see an Auroch on the mountain.

another safety sign:
! EKT ! APASHAL ! EE'AGAARAM_MEE !
! Beware of/on Mountain ! Keep.Alert !

ShteAlantalesht aaazatz apashal
I see my friend.

ShteAalajesht aaazatz apashal.
I see my wife.

GeAalajeg aaazatz apashal {to an ally or a patron}
I see your wife.
PfeAaajaep aaazatz apashal {to a friend or client}

test...keep or not...
aswaalaat = keeping -> policy
test syntax:
aswaalaat shke {our} dweaapaachew {within-which (is)} ... geaarakeg aab {is} (aab) {is to/call} aaajath {kill}
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Re: The Region's languages: (latest: Mutating Conlang)

Post by Keenir » Mon 07 Dec 2015, 05:57

MUTATING CONLANG:

part one: the mutating part:

This part of the conlang obeys a Mandarin-style layout:
CV.CV(C) is allowed
CVC.CV(C) is allowed.
CVC.V(C) is not allowed.
(like in Mandarin, an easy way to see if a given consonant is part of one syllable or another, is to look to its right; if there's a vowel, the consonant is part of that syllable with the vowel. if there is another consonant to its right, then its part of the preceeding syllable)

This part is known from texts and "billboards"...there's likely more words in spoken sentences, but they aren't written down. pro-drop scriptorally?

*
makrapa lese teger
makra-pa lese teger
lake-on,atop ice cleave
"split the ice apart"

*
makrapa rese nal
lake-on,atop ice DEF
"the ice on the lake"

*
bedesnallet tegerpassen nal
bedesnallet teger-passen nal
baby cleave-knife DEF
"cut/split the baby"

*
makrapa lese teger kowal
makra-pa lese teger ko-wal
he,she-PAST
"he split the ice apart"

Side Note: tense and other TAM-related usefulnesses need not be included...but when you include any of them, you must also include the person who is doing it.

*
pannawels ritta nal
panna-wels ritta nal
hold,contain,(jar)-under lid DEF
Lit. "The lower/under-lid"
Cellar door.

*
makrawels rese teger
makra-wels rese teger
lake-under ice cleave
The lake [under the ice] splits apart.

*
makrapotl rese teger {permissible, but LESE is better/preferred}
makra-potl rese teger
lake-both,together ice cleave
The lake and ice split (apart)

*
pannawels ritta nal kedremol nili nal.
panna-wels ritta nal kedre-mol nili nal
cellar door DEF spear-does [action]stopped DEF
the cellar door is speared/impaled.

*
Kopotlnal kedremol nili lata polur nal.
ko-potl-nal kedre-mol nili lata polur nal
he,she,person-both-DEF spear-does [action]stopped [action]started,begun bleed DEF
"Jesus impaled and bleeding"
{in an early heresy's view}

*
Kopotrnal? -> epithentic vowel -> kopotranal
ko-potra-nal
he,she,person-Trio-DEF

*
lese lata nal
ice [action]starts DEF
The frost.

*
polur nili nal
bleed [action]stopping DEF
Clotting.

ICE
lese -- still
rese -- changing

BLOOD
polur -- still
po(_)ur -- changing

BABY
bedesrallet -- still {held}
bedesnallet -- changing

LAKE
makra -- still
mak(_)a -- changing

*
makrapa lese teger kogin
makra-pa lese teger ko-gin
he,she,person-FUTURE.Definately
He'll split the ice apart.

*
tse (tse) pamol pagin Kopotranal ___gin.
tse (tse) pa-molpa-gin ko-potranal ___-gin
sun (sun) up-does up-FUTURE.Definately {.} return-FUTURE.Definately
The sun will rise, Jesus will return.

*
makrapa lese teger koparm
makra-pa lese teger ko-parm
he,she,person-FUTURE.maybe.CONDITIONAL
He'll split the ice apart. (or it'll crack at least)

Side Note: not sure why, but I started to write "kopram".

*
Kopotranal ___gin (nal) tefet koparm
possible translations:
"Jesus will return. [He'll come] tomorrow, maybe?"
or
"Jesus will return...tomorrow?" added with less certainty.
or
"Jesus will return tomorrow if..."

===========================================
PART TWO:
Inspired by Alabama...another side to Mutating Conlang: the Curse Tablets!

Whereas the preceeding parts of MC have obeyed a Mandarin-style CV(C).CVC, the curse tablets use words which obey strict CVCC.CVCC, and there is debate over whether this is evidence of a mixed language (as the VC prefixes are commonly accepted as originally loans picked up during the Migratory Phase), a division assigning CVCC and CVC to different aspects of the language, or an artifact of preservation, as CVC words are never found on curse tablets, just as CVCC words are only found on curse tablets.

AFFECTEDNESS
-pa is a suffix which appears to only be attached on words serving as verbs when they are in a state of affectedness - actions performed directly with one's body (and descriptives derived from such things), and thus are frequently found in use alongside various reflexives...

Reflexives
REF1 and REF2

REF1 is used for deities and kings. If no king or deity is named, then assume it is referring to yourself or the author.
Hangshmotd iv-lortrirn lurdmirt-pa
[haNS.motd iv.lort.rirn lurd.mirt.pa]
(name) REF1-bestow bounty,riches
Hangshmotd gets riches
(or, more flowery, "Oh Lord Hangshmotd, of abundant bounty")

REF2 is used for others.
Id-lortrirn Gard foshtninttabt
[id.lort.rirn gard foSt.nint.tabt]
REF2-bestow (name) pox
Gard gets pox.

And now we can better read the Lonhogh Curse Tablet:
Hangshmotd ivlortrirn lurdmirt,
++
Idlortrirn Gard foshtninttabt.

The symbol between the two lines, here depicted with ++, is generally accepted to be read as "make it so" or "here is my curse"
At work on Apaan: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4799
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